Medical Council of Canada (MCC) (French: Le Conseil médical du Canada) is an organization that is charged with assessing medical candidates, evaluation of physicians through exams and granting a qualification called Licentiate of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC) to those who wish to practice medicine in Canada.

MCC is governed by a 51-member Executive Board of Council, who meets once a year to discuss budgets, policies and assets. The day-to-day operation is carried out by the Executive Director, currently Dr. M. Ian Bowmer.

Founded by the Canada Medical Act in 1912 through the effort of Sir Thomas Roddick, a physician and Member of Parliament, who have been pursuing a standardized licensing scheme in Canada for over 18 years.

Beginning April 1912, MCC gave the right to practice throughout Canada, to be admitted to the British Medical Register (BMR) to serve in the medical forces of the army and navy.

The practice for registering physicians into the BMR eventually ceased but those who wish to practice in the UK can register themselves with the General Medical Council.

The Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) is a two-part professional exam sponsored by the Medical Council of Canada. It is an essential part of becoming a Licentiate of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC).
The Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part 1 consists of 196 multiple choice questions to be completed within 3.5 hours, and around 60 clinical decision making scenarios, to be completed in 4 hours. The examination is in a computer-adaptive format, where the test adapts to how well you are doing.

The Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part 2 consists of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination with a total of 14 stations, of which 8 are 10-minute standardized patient stations and 6 are 5-minute standardized patient stations, with 5 minutes for written questions. This examination can only be taken after 12 months of graduate clinical training.